After the Ind VS NZ World Cup T20 loss, skipper Kohli did a U-Turn and called match-breaks ‘ridiculous’ after calling them helpful at one point during the tournament. The skipper’s statement came after team India suffered a second consecutive loss in the ICC T20 World Cup playing against New Zealand. The Kiwis registered a clinical victory against India, pushing the latter further down in the league table. After the 8-wicket loss his team endured, skipper Kohli was also quoted saying that the team was not “brave enough” with either the ball or the bat. The defeat comes at a time when questions around Virat Kohli’s captaincy in ICC tournaments have been raised.

Background

Hard-core cricket enthusiasts would remember India’s rocky and disappointing journey in the ICC 2007 ODI World Cup. The Rahul Dravid-led team was being looked as the fan favorite with the likes of Sachin Tendulkar, Virendra Sehwag, Sourav Ganguly, Zaheer Khan, Anil Kumble and more. However, to much of every Indian fan’s disappointing, the team couldn’t even make it through to the league stage, let alone fight it out in the Super-8 stage.

First it was Bangladesh that upset team India and then another biting defeat was served by Sri Lanka. Cricket pundits said that it was the worst performance team India gave at an ICC tournament.

The notion was changed once and for all by Virat Kohli-led team India at the ongoing ICC T20 World Cup.


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The Facts of the Matter

Amid scrutiny that comes with a loss, even the sharpest leaders turn a back on their own views and do a U-Turn. Team India skipper All the microphones and eyes are set on Virat Kohli, who has led a defeated side in the T20 world cup. After his team endured another loss by the New Zealand team, captain Kohli contradicted himself when it comes to match-breaks.


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“Ridiculous”: Virat Kohli’s New Stand on Match Breaks

Calling the match scheduling for the ongoing ICC T20 World Cup ‘ridiculous’, Virat did a U-Turn as he had earlier claimed that the match-breaks are helpful. On Sunday before India took on New Zealand, Virat Kohli said at the toss, “It’s ridiculous, we are playing twice in 10 days. Too long a break..”

Just a week ago on Sunday India was bested by Pakistan in a 10-wicket defeat. After the match ended, skipper Kohli said something exactly opposite. The number-3 batsman said that week long breaks are helpful as the team had come after playing a high-octane tournament in the form of IPL.

“Big Breaks Are Definitely That Helps Team”: Skipper Kohli’s Earlier Statement

“I think it works really well for us from all point of views. Knowing that we have played a full-fledged season already, we played the IPL, which is very high octane by itself in testing conditions here in the UAE, and then we come into the World Cup” Kohli had said.

“So for us, these big breaks are definitely something that’s going to help us as a team to be in the prime physical condition that we need to be to play this high intensity tournament,” Kohli further added, as quoted in an NDTV report.


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IND VS NZ: Batters Fail, Bowlers Lose Hope

Team India slipped at further down in the league table of the ongoing ICC T20 World Cup. After facing a tough 10-wicket loss from arch rivals Pakistan, team India were in for another heartbreak on October 31. The team’s batters looked to be in an abysmal form, barely crossing the 100 run mark in 20 overs.

Only Rishabh Pant looked somewhat stable and calm, playing a much needed inning of 26 runs. Other than him, every other batter failed at the bowling of New Zealand.

Defending a lowly total of 111, team Indian bowlers had an equally bad day at the office. An early wicket of Martin Guptil did fill fans with a senseless hope. However in the next 9 overs, Daryl Mitchell and Kane Williamson made sure the match drifts away from India.